Viewing posts for the category Information Security

Wi-Fi for SMB - Things to Consider

I came across a good little article [^1] earlier in the week about setting up guest Wi-Fi and I think it should really hit home with many small business owners. Simply throwing up a wireless access point and connecting it to the rest of your network so guests can have internet access is a great way to cause yourself a whole lot of pain. Not only does doing something like that have harsh PCI compliance ramifications, your systems are wide open to anyone connecting to your Wi-Fi. Depending on the range your access point allows you could have a data breach without the attacker even setting foot on your property giving any physical controls you may have in place a zero chance of working.

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Bus Factor

Many of you may be familiar with bus factor, lottery, truck factor, and/or bus/truck number. For those that aren't though, I wanted to take a small moment to explain it. The concept is quite simple. This "factor" is nothing more than a scary way of labelling the number of developers a project could stand to lose (get hit by a bus) before the project couldn't continue. People have various events in their lives that permit or prevent them from performing certain tasks. As with software development someone's ability to keep working on a project could be taken away by changing jobs, getting a promotion, winning the lottery and quitting, or the more tragic getting hit by a bus/truck.

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Old vs New: A Comparison of Magnetic Stripe and Chip-and-PIN

I was doing some poking around on the internet recently, reading various stories about different network breaches and loss of credit card numbers and I was reminded of the semi-recent Target breach and how they're making a push to switch to chip-and-PIN cards. This made me think it would be a good idea to do a a write up on the differences between chip-and-PIN and traditional magnetic stripe credit cards.

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I Have Vulnerabilities On My LAN. So What?!

During the course of my penetration testing engagements (where I pretend I'm a malicious user and attempt to do naughty things on the network), I usually see or detect many vulnerabilities that are typically not found on the public internet. These vulnerabilities range from a small information disclosure (yawn) to full remote code execution (OH YES!) and of course everything in between. As a good security professional, my recommendations are to fix every single vulnerability found. This would exclude vulns that exist due to a specific business need, such as legacy systems or applications, or other legitimate reasons. When I suggest that we fix all of them, I often receive pushback from IT staff and sometimes even the stakeholders.

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